North Carolina Domestic Violence Statistics

National statistics from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention’s (CDC) National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (published in November 2011) show that domestic violence continues to be a serious issue affecting men, women and children.

 

National Domestic Violence Statistics

According to the CDC study,

  • Nearly 3 in 10 women and 1 in 10 men in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner and reported at least one impact related to experiencing these or other forms of violent behavior in the relationship (e.g., being fearful, concerned for safety, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, need for health care, injury, contacting a crisis hotline, need for housing services, need for victim’s advocate services, need for legal services, missed at least one day of work or school).
  • More than half (51.1%) of female victims of rape reported being raped by an intimate partner and 40.8% by an acquaintance; for male victims, more than half (52.4%) reported being raped by an acquaintance and 15.1% by a stranger.
  • An estimated 13% of women and 6% of men have experienced sexual coercion in their lifetime (i.e., unwanted sexual penetration after being pressured in a nonphysical way); and 27.2% of women and 11.7% of men have experienced unwanted sexual contact.
  • Most female victims of completed rape (79.6%) experienced their first rape before the age of 25; 42.2% experienced their first completed rape before the age of 18 years.
  • More than one-quarter of male victims of completed rape (27.8%) experienced their first rape when they were 10 years of age or younger.

Converting those percentages into actual numbers can be eye-opening. According to the National Violence Against Women Survey, approximately 1.3 million women and 835,000 men are physically assaulted by an intimate partner in the United States every year.

Many of these physical assaults involve the use of firearms. According to the Risk Factors For Femicide in Abusive Relationships, access to firearms yields a more than five-fold increase in risk of intimate partner homicide when considering other factors of abuse, suggesting that abusers who possess guns tend to inflict the most severe abuse on their partners.

North Carolina Rape Statistics for Selected Cities and Counties

The North Carolina Department of Justice and the State Bureau of Investigation’s (SBI) Annual Summary Report of 2011 Uniform Crime Reporting Data provides information on the number of rapes reported in the state. According to the report, there were 1,942 rapes reported in 2011 – only slightly down from 1,949 reported in 2010.

Of the rapes reported in 2011, the majority (86%) of abusers used their hands, fists and feet to commit the crime; only 3% used a handgun or other firearm and 3.5% used a knife or blunt object.

The SBI’s data, listed below, shows the number of rapes reported in North Carolina’s 15 largest cities and the 10 largest county sheriff offices over a 12 month period.

Municipal Police
Asheville
Cary
Charlotte-Mecklenburg
Concord
Durham
Fayetteville
Gaston County
Gastonia
Greensboro
Greenville
High Point
Raleigh
Rocky Mount
Wilmington
Winston-Salem
County Sheriffs
Buncombe
Davidson
Forsyth
Guilford
Iredell
Johnston
Onslow
Randolph
Union
Wake
Rapes Reported In 2011
22
13
216
8
63
56
6
36
85
25
25
123
13
32
92
Rapes Reported In 2010
15
8
18
13
9
19
37
12
13
22
Rapes Reported In 2010
31
13
234
10
60
57
17
21
54
18
26
98
15
47
96
Rapes Reported In 2010
12
8
20
12
12
25
38
3
23
26

Under Reporting Is Common

While these statistics seem astonishing, the truth of the matter is that a great deal of domestic violence incidents are simply not reported. Part of the reason for that is that many North Carolina cities and counties are not required to – or simply do not – accurately report acts of domestic violence.

The other, and larger, part is that many domestic violence survivors do not want others to know about what happened them. There are many reasons for that including:

  • fear of repercussion
  • threats of future violence
  • guilt
  • shame
  • feelings of worthlessness
  • fear of negative responses
  • simply wanting it to be “over” – without more

Sadly, men who are domestic violence survivors often feel too embarrassed to report these incidents based on societal gender stigmas.

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